As more states and municipalities consider regulations and limitations on the use of gas-powered outdoor power equipment, Rural Lifestyle Dealer has compiled a timeline of where and when these rulings are being enacted.


Updated July 8, 2024

New Jersey's Gas Powered Leaf Blower Ban Heats Up, Criticism Builds

While certain New Jersey communities have already either accepted or vetoed gas-powered leaf blower bans, New Jersey is considering banning them statewide. According to a report from News 12 New Jersey, in mid-June, a state senate committee advanced a bill that would ban gas-powered leaf blowers for the majority of the calendar year, but still permit certain varieties to be used during peak cleanup periods during spring and fall. 

While the state's motive for banning gas-powered leaf blowers, like many other states, comes from a place of wanting to reduce noise pollution and greenhouse gas emissions, landscaping companies and individual residents continue to highlight possible unintentional negative consequences that would result from banning such blowers. 

Many who oppose the ban have said they support the implementation of a gradual transition to battery powered blowers but would prefer to phase it in while allowing better technology, specifically in regards to battery longevity, to have time to be developed in the meantime. 

Director of Environment New Jersey Doug O'Malley says more than 100 cities across the U.S. have either restricted or banned gas-powered leaf blowers. O'Malley says operating a gas-powered leaf blower for 1 hour is the equivalent to the amount of pollution caused by driving a car for 1,100 miles. 


Updated June 14, 2024

Santa Cruz’s Gas Powered Leaf Blower Ban Intensifies

Santa Cruz, California, recently had its City Council read the Ordinance banning the use of gas powered leaf blowers according to a June 12 report by the Santa Cruz Sentinel.

Citing concerns over emissions, as well as sound pollution, this is following Assembly Bill 1346, which was put in effect on Jan. 1. This prohibited the sale of these leaf blowers but was silent on the regulation of those already in use.

Santa Cruz city council voted all in favor of continuing with the ordinance and the council will hear the final proposal for the ban on June 25.


Updated March 18, 2024

Portland City Council Votes to Ban Gas-Powered Leaf Blowers

The City Council of Portland, Ore., has voted to ban the use of gas-powered leaf blowers by 2028, according to a March 13 report from Oregon Public Broadcasting.

Gas-powered leaf blowers will be prohibited in 2026, except during the fall and winter and by 2028, they will be banned completely. Those who violate the policy will face a fine of up to $1,000.


Updated Feb. 7, 2024

Virginia Bill to Allow Local Gas-Powered Leaf Blower Bans Advances

A subcommittee in the Virginia House has approved a bill that would allow local governments to ban the use of gas-powered leaf blowers, according to a Jan. 26 report from WRIC.


Updated Jan. 25, 2024

New Jersey Mayor Vetoes Gas-Powered Leaf Blower Ban

Mayor Susan McCartney of West Orange, N.J., recently vetoed an ordinance that would ban gas-powered leaf blowers, according to a Jan. 24 report from TapintoWestOrange

McCartney stated in a letter to the township clerk that she vetoed the ordinance due to "the current state of the technology and the substantial burden it will place disproportionately on various people, including but not limited to seniors and the business community directly impacted by the proposed Ordinance."


Updated Jan. 2, 2024

Michigan City Bans Gas-Powered Leaf Blowers

The city council of Ann Arbor, Mich., has unanimously voted to ban gas-powered leaf blowers, according to a Dec. 19 report from Fox Business.

The new law will fully ban gas blowers starting Jan. 1, 2028, but until then they will be allowed from October through May only.


Updated Dec. 14, 2023

California City Bans Gas-Powered Leaf Blowers

The city council of Pleaston, Calif., has voted to ban gas-powered leaf blowers within the city, according to a Dec. 14 report from The Independent. City residents who use gas-powered leaf blowers could be cited starting in June.


Updated Dec. 11, 2023

Washington to Consider Ban on Gas-Powered OPE Sales

Washington state legislator Amy Walen recently introduced House Bill 1868, which would ban gas-powered outdoor power equipment produced after Jan. 1, 2026, according to a Dec. 7 article from the Capital Press. The ban would apply to lawnmowers, chainsaws, leaf blowers, snow blowers and other equipment.


Updated Oct. 11, 2023

Maryland County Bans Gas-Powered Leaf Blowers

Montgomery County lawmakers in Maryland voted 10 to 1 to ban gas-powered leaf blowers earlier this month, according to a report from the DCist. Gas-powered leaf blowers will be illegal to sell as of July 1, 2024, and illegal to use exactly one year later. Two jurisdictions within the county had already passed bans on leaf blowers.

The legislation will create a rebate program for purchasing electric leaf blowers.

The one Council member to vote no stated the ban would put a heavy financial burden on landscapers. 


Updated Sept. 21, 2023

Colorado State Government to Cease Using Gas-Powered OPE by OPE

Colorado Governor Jared Polis signed an executive order on Sept. 13 requiring state facilities to phase out the use of gas-powered lawn and garden equipment by June 2025, according to a report from Colorado Politics. Facilities would be required to switch to electric equipment.

The report stated the following:

The phase-out of gas lawn equipment applies to facilities within the Denver metro and North Front Range areas, where air quality doesn't meet federal standards. Contractors that use electric equipment will be also prioritized to tend to those facilities. State agencies must study the feasibility of a statewide phase-out before February 2024. 

This follows the Denver Regional Air Quality Council voting July 7 to ban the sale of gas-powered lawn equipment in the Denver metro area, according to a report from CBS Colorado. The Colorado Air Quality Control Commission will vote on that plan in December.


Updated July 29, 2023

Texas to Ban Restrictions on Gas-Powered Equipment

Texas Senate Bill 1017 was signed into law back in May and prohibits limiting or banning the use, sale or lease of an engine based on its fuel source, according to a July 20 report from Governing. The City of Dallas will no longer push for a total ban on gas-powered equipment within the city.

Carlos Evans, director of Dallas’ environmental quality and sustainability office, told Governing that his office will propose to the City Council to phase out all city-owned gasoline-fueled landscaping equipment and to create an incentive program for residents and businesses who want to transition to electric tools.


Updated July 10, 2023

Denver Approves Ban on Sale of Gas-Powered Lawn Equipment

The Denver Regional Air Quality Council voted July 7 to ban the sale of gas-powered lawn equipment in the Denver metro area, according to a July 7 report from CBS Colorado. The Colorado Air Quality Control Commission will now vote on the plan in December.

The ban on sales of gas-powered OPE would go into effect in 2025 and would affect lawn mowers, leaf blowers and weed whackers. Use of gas-powered commercial equipment would be "limited" from June to August.


Updated July 7, 2023

Toronto Considers Ban on Gas-Powered Leaf Blowers

The city of Toronto's council will consider a motion to ban gas-powered leaf blowers on July 19, according to a July 1 report from CBC. Chris Keating, chair of the noise and pollution committee for the Deer Park Residents Group, gave a deputation at the city's Infrastructure and Environment Committee meeting on June 27 and cited a 2021 Toronto Public Health report which referred to noise and pollution from the use of two-stroke engines as a "nuisance."

Toronto city councillor Dianne Saxe told CBC that, "she's confident the ban will receive support from city council and Toronto's new mayor Olivia Chow when it's brought forward next month."


Updated May 12, 2023

Georgia Bans Regulations on Gas-Powered Equipment

The Landscape Equipment and Agricultural Fairness (LEAF) Act was signed into Georgia law by Georgia Governor Brian Kemp on May 8, according to a report from Green Industry Pros. Georgia is the first state to implement such a law.

The bill reportedly, "prohibits local governments from regulating gas-powered leaf blowers differently than other types of leaf blowers such as battery-powered leaf blowers."


Updated April 20, 2023

Wisconsin Assembly Passes Bills Prohibiting Gas-Powered Equipment Bans

The Wisconsin State Assembly has passed 2 bills that would forbid local and state government from banning gas-powered outdoor power equipment, according to an April 18 report from the Associated Press. The bills apply to gas-powered equipment markets outside outdoor power equipment as well.

The bills still need to be approved by the Wisconsin Senate and Governor Tony Evers. The report stated Evers was "likely to veto them."


Updated March 30, 2023

Maryland County Tables Bill Banning Gas-Powered Leaf Blowers

Lawmakers in Montgomery County, Md., have tabled a bill that would have banned gas-powered leaf blowers, according to a March 21 report from Fox 5.

The proposed law would include a rebate for consumers to trade in their gas-powered leaf blowers for electric ones. Fines for breaking the proposed law would begin at $500 for the first offense.

The report stated one local landscaping company had launched an "all-electric service" in anticipation of the ban, calling it a "major expense."


Updated March 30, 2023

Georgia Bill Protecting Gas-Powered Leaf Blowers Passes House Vote

A Georgia bill that would prohibit local governments from banning gas-powered outdoor power equipment has passed a Georgia House of Representatives vote, according to a March 27 report from the Georgia Recorder.

"In House and Senate committee hearings, the bill’s author, Johns Creek Republican Sen. Shawn Still, said no Georgia municipality has banned gas blowers, but cities and counties in other states are doing so, and preventing such moves in Georgia will protect landscaping businesses from having to spend big dollars on tools he says are inferior," the report said.

The bill passed by a House vote of 103 to 67 and will now head back to the Senate.


Updated March 6, 2023

Georgia Bill Would Prohibit Bans on Gas-Powered Equipment

A Feb. 17 report from the Atlanta Journal-Constitution said Georgia senators are seeking to pass a law that would prohibit local governments from banning gas-powered outdoor power equipment.

"State Sen. Shawn Still, representing Johns Creek, is the lead sponsor of Senate Bill 145, the Landscape Equipment and Agricultural Fairness, or LEAF Act, which would outlaw regulations that treat gas-powered leaf blowers differently than other, similar tools," the article said.

The report stated it could not find records of previous local bans on gas-powered equipment in Georgia.


Updated Feb. 21, 2023

Minnesota to Consider Ban on Gas-Powered Lawn Equipment

According to a Feb. 21 note from the Pioneer Equipment Dealers Assn., a new bill — HF 1715 — was introduced last week in Minnesota and would prohibit the sale of gasoline powered lawn equipment like lawn mowers and leaf blowers after Jan. 1, 2025. Instead, those products would be required to be powered solely by electricity. 

The note from the association reads as follows:

"There are several questions surrounding this bill including: 1) will the manufacturers be able to produce enough battery powered equipment to fulfill demand, 2) how will inflationary pressure effect the price of equipment, 3) what are the performance comparisons of gasoline powered vs. battery powered equipment and, likewise, residential vs. commercial equipment, 4) how many Minnesota residents will drive out of state to purchase gasoline powered equipment for use in Minnesota, 5) and many more.

"If HF 1715 eventually passes, it would make Minnesota only the second state in the country to ban gasoline powered lawn equipment. California passed a similar bill last year which is set to take effect in 2024.

"It's important to note that as of right now, HF 1715 doesn't have a companion bill in the Minnesota Senate...yet.  Both the House and Senate need to pass a bill, and Gov. Walz would need to sign it for it to become law.

"HF 1715 has been referred to the House Commerce Finance and Policy committee, which would need to pass it before moving it on to the full House for consideration."

The full text of HF 1715 reads as follows:

[325F.187] FOSSIL FUEL POWERED LAWN AND GARDEN EQUIPMENT; PROHIBITION.

(a) On and after January 1, 2025, new lawn and garden equipment sold, offered for sale, or distributed in or into Minnesota must be powered solely by electricity.

(b) For the purposes of this section, the following terms have the meanings given:

       (1) "lawn and garden equipment" means any of the following types of equipment

            powered by a spark ignition engine rated at or below 19 kilowatts or 25 gross

            horsepower:

            (i) lawnmower;

            (ii) leaf blower;

            (iii) hedge clipper;

            (iv) chainsaw;

            (v) lawn edger;

            (vi) string trimmer; or

            (vii) brushcutter; and

     (2) "spark ignition engine" means an internal combustion engine in which the

           air-fuel mixture is ignited by a spark.


Updated Jan. 12, 2023

Connecticut City Restricts Use of Gas-Powered Leaf Blowers

According to a Jan. 5 report from The Wilton Bulletin, the city of Westport. Conn., will beginning restricting the use of gas-powered leaf blowers on May 15.

The article lines out the following restrictions from the city:

  • Beginning May 15, gas-powered leaf blowers cannot be used on state or federal holidays. From May 15 to Oct. 14, gas-powered leaf blowers can be used from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays through Fridays and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturdays, but cannot be used on Sundays.
  • Only one gas-powered leaf blower can be used on a property of a quarter acre or less.
  • Starting May 15, 2024, the use of gas-powered leaf blowers will not be permitted in the summer.

The restrictions do not apply to leaf blowers used on state- of town-owned properties.

The report quoted Lisa Henderson with Tuff Lawn Lawn Service and Fairfield County Tick Control as saying, "Not only will this ordinance have an economic impact on both the landscape and lawn care industry, and home owners, but will increase costs in the landscape industry will be passed on to homeowners in several ways." She cited the cost of investments in charging stations and possibly generators to keep batteries charged for electric leaf blowers.

The resolution says the purpose of the ordinance is to protect the health and safety of residents to reduce nuisances.

This follows news from last November that officials in Dallas, Texas, are planning to phase out the use of gasoline-powered lawnmowers, leaf blowers and landscaping equipment by 2027 or 2030 within the city.


Updated Dec. 29, 2023

72% of Dealers Worried About Bans on Gas-Powered Lawn Equipment

According to a recent poll from Rural Lifestyle Dealer, 71.9% of dealers are concerned to some degree about being impacted by bans on gas-powered lawn equipment over the next 3 years.

Some 26.8% of dealers said they were very concerned about the potential for a ban on gas-powered lawn equipment to be announced in their area over the next 3 years. Another 28.1% said they were not concerned at all.


The most popular category for dealers to choose was "somewhat concerned" at 31.7%.

The catalyst for the poll came from a Nov. 28 report from The Dallas Morning News, which reported officials in Dallas, Texas, are planning to phase out the use of gasoline-powered lawnmowers, leaf blowers and landscaping equipment by 2027 or 2030 within the city. "The city in August estimated it would cost $6.5 million to fully convert more than 5,400 pieces of gas-powered municipal equipment, and the cost for residents and business owners to switch was estimated to be $23 million," the report stated. 

“Instead of a ban, the city could limit its proposal to a reasonable rebate fund that would make battery-powered equipment more cost competitive and allow companies to purchase commercial-grade equipment as it became technologically feasible,” Ryan Skrobarczyk, the Texas Nursery and Landscape Assn.’s director of legislative and regulatory affairs, told The Dallas Morning News.

How Bans Impact Dealers

According to a custom research report from Ag Equipment Intelligence, "Electric Farm Machinery: Outlook Through 2027," restrictions and bans surrounding gas-powered equipment are already driving equipment purchases in areas where they've taken effect.

Martha Hennigan, director of sales operations and marketing at Solectrac in Windsor, Calif., told Ag Equipment Intelligence that California law requiring non-emissions for handhelds and operating equipment up to the zero-turn mower range “already has landscapers stockpiling like crazy.

“Some of the demand was already there because of noise ordinances,” she said, noting that the vast majority of buyers already accepted the handheld equipment.

In March 2022, Ag Equipment Intelligence asked California dealers how many “advance sales” (sales coming faster than normal buying behaviors) they expected to see in their AOR in the next 2 years as landscape contractors, municipalities and residential buyers try to beat the large expenses of new equipment that complies with the new regulations.

About 22% of dealers who responded to the survey predict a 71% increase or more in zero-turn sales, another 22% estimate a 50-70% change, about 44% predict less than 50% change, and the remaining 11% anticipate little to no change.


Updated Dec. 8, 2023

Dallas Officials Consider Ban of Gas-Powered Lawn Equipment

According to a Nov. 28 report from The Dallas Morning News, officials in Dallas, Texas, are planning to phase out the use of gasoline-powered lawnmowers, leaf blowers and landscaping equipment by 2027 or 2030 within the city. The report stated officials were citing "health, noise and environmental concerns" as reasons for the potential ban. The ban would apply to residents, contractors, businesses and city departments.

"The city in August estimated it would cost $6.5 million to fully convert more than 5,400 pieces of gas-powered municipal equipment, and the cost for residents and business owners to switch was estimated to be $23 million," the report stated. 

The ban reportedly is being opposed by the Texas Nursery and Landscape Assn., which has 60 members in the city of Dallas.

“Instead of a ban, the city could limit its proposal to a reasonable rebate fund that would make battery-powered equipment more cost competitive and allow companies to purchase commercial-grade equipment as it became technologically feasible,” Ryan Skrobarczyk, the association’s director of legislative and regulatory affairs, told The Dallas Morning News.